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Theory of Change

Theory of Change

  • PROBLEM STATEMENT

    • A safe, affordable place to call home can foster resilience from trauma and support overall well-being.  But too often, tight margins and heavy regulation in the affordable housing industry place the focus on compliance and risk managment instead.
 
 
 
 

Daily stressors and trauma influence a wide range of outcomes within the housing delivery system.

For Residents and Staff
For POAH
For Affordable Housing Delivery System
Trauma disrupts resident well-being, makes it hard to maintain stable housing, and takes a lasting toll on staff. Trauma impedes our success as an organization, disrupting our operations and making it harder to deliver on our mission. We miss opportunities to improve resident, property, and community outcomes – and run the risk of perpetuating harm
 
 
 
 
Activities
Centering the lived experience of staff and residents through co-design processes and integrating principles of trauma-informed care.
Outcomes
  • POAH residents and staff
  • POAH as an organization
  • The Affordable Housing Delivery System
 
 
 
 
Our Goal
To develop and test a more effective and equitable model for affordable housing that benefits staff, residents, and property performance

THEORY OF CHANGE: A Closer Look

PROBLEM STATEMENT

We know that when life hits us with stressful, overwhelming or traumatic experiences, we are more likely to bounce back – be resilient – when we have healthy ways to cope and a supportive environment. A safe, affordable place to call home can foster resilience and support overall well-being. But too often, tight margins and heavy regulation in the affordable housing industry place the focus on compliance and risk management instead.

Trauma can inflence a wide range of outcomes within the housing delivery system, including:

For Residents and Staff
For POAH
For Affordable Housing Delivery System
Trauma impacts our bodies, brains and behavior, disrupting individual housing outcomes and well-being more generally. It can also take a lasting toll on staff, who have their own encounters with first and second hand trauma in their work and personal lives. Trauma impedes our success as an organization. When residents are unable to comply with complex housing rules and policies, our business suffers. When staff are overwhelmed or exhausted, our mission suffers. When we overlook the impact of trauma on people and communities, we miss opportunities to improve resident, property, and community outcomes – and run the risk of perpetuating harm.
 

Activities

Centering the lived experience of staff and residents across our housing delivery model through co-design processes and integrating principles of trauma- informed care. This includes changes in:

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Transforming policies and processes that don’t work for people into ones that do.

RESIDENT SERVICES
Generating new opportunities for residents to have power and leadership and build social capital.

PHYSICAL DESIGN
Creating spaces that respond to resident experience and promote well-being.

 

Outcomes

POAH RESIDENTS AND STAFF

  • Improved Resident Well-being and Agency
  • Improved Resident Housing Stability and Economic Security
  • Improved Resident Engagement and Leadership
  • Improved Staff Satisfaction and Well-being

POAH AS AN ORGANIZATION

  • Decreased Resident and Staff turnover
  • Increased Property Financial Health
  • Improved Delivery on Mission

THE AFFORDABLE HOUSING DELIVERY SYSTEM

  • New models created to benefit other organizations and residents
  • Evidence supporting policy changes that reflect the double-bottom-line benefits of the trauma-resilient model

Our Goal

To develop and test a more effective and equitable model for affordable housing that increases staff wellbeing and retention and improves resident experience, all while improving property performance (more on time rent payments, faster inspections, fewer evictions, etc.).

Our learnings will be captured in a playbook for other owners and operators of service enriched housing across the country.

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